Each Day of Construction

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Shop rules during construction:

The construction will take place in a large equipment shed at the UNH Kingman Farm in Madbury, NH, near the UNH campus. Building jigs and shelter are provided. There is limited power, which must be shared. There is no heat. Because we are guests, participants must be especially mindful of parking, toilet facilities, and clean up.

Additional observer guests can be accommodated with permission. Very small children will require supervision by non-builders to keep construction on schedule.

Shop rules and safety procedures must be followed assiduously. No power tools are allowed except drill, saber/jig saw, and sander.


Check out the daily construction images of our boats in progress:

Start of Day 1 - Friday

The building jig and all parts are ready for an early start for your family and your Docent mentor. Work begins with the installation of frames, stem, and transom, followed by fitting chines and rails. The sides are fitted and installed, then chines and sides are planed and the bottom fitted and installed. Look at the next photo to see how much you will accomplish in one day!

First day of construction with boat components

Photo by John Badger


Start of Day 2 - Saturday

The keel and centerboard installation are the first order of business. A milestone is freeing the boat from the jig and turning it over. The floor boards are fitted and the seat risers, gunwales, king plank, and knees are installed. Now it really looks like a boat and you are convinced you will be successful.

Second day of boat construction

Photo by John Badger


Start of Day 3 - Sunday

Now a lot of time consuming detail is required to install the mast step, deck, and rudder, shape the spars, and fit the seat. Drilling the mast hole in the deck allows fitting and installing the spars. The final step is bending on the sail and learning to use the reefing system. You are ready to clean up, put away the building jig, and take your boat home.

Third day of construction

Photo by John Badger


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