GIS-based Maps of the Lamprey River Watershed

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Project Type: 
Research
Project Number: 
M/D-0906
Inception Date: 
2009
Completion Date: 
2010

Participants:

Erika Washburn UNH - Department of Natural Resources & the Environment Principal Investigator
Proposal: 
There are 14 towns within the Lamprey River watershed, and UNH alumna Erika Washburn wants each one to understand how their plan­ning decisions could impact the surround­ing communities, waterways and ultimately Great Bay. To that end, she created GIS maps that provide valuable data including conserved public land, subwatersheds, land use types and cultural resources within the watershed. Washburn, who received her Ph.D. in 2009, focused on land use decision making in this coastal watershed for her dissertation research. Her commitment to environmental policy, planning and outreach helped to foster creative dialogue among the towns about the impacts of their land use decisions, culminating in a conference in 2009 that focused entirely on the Lamprey River watershed. With support from N.H. Sea Grant and the Great Bay NERR, she was able to provide copies of the map for each town.
To see the maps in PDF form, follow this link to the National Sea Grant Library: http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/nhu/nhum10001/nhum10001index.html
 
Accomplishments

 
2011
 
GIS Maps Guide Land Use Planning
As part of her dissertation research, a Ph.D. student from UNH designed GIS maps of each of the 14 towns within the Lamprey River watershed, printed them out in hard copy using Sea Grant and GBNERR funding and distributed them to each town in 2011. The maps provide information on the land use, cultural resources and watershed boundaries and will help the towns to implement ecosystem-based watershed-scaled land use planning. They have been used for the Lamprey River watershed conference and will be used by town boards, committees, commissions and citizens.
 

2010


 

N.H. Coastal Planning Aided by GIS Maps

There are 14 towns within New Hampshire's Lamprey River watershed, and each one's planning decisions could impact the surrounding communities, waterways and ultimately Great Bay. With support in part by NHSG, a UNH graduate student created GIS maps that provide valuable data including conserved public land, subwatersheds, land use types and cultural resources within the watershed. The maps helped foster creative dialogue among the towns about the impacts of their land use decisions, culminating in a conference that focused entirely on the Lamprey River watershed. (2010)