Education (2014-2017)

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Project Type: 
Extension
Project Number: 
E/EL-3

Participants:

Dari Christenson N.H. Sea Grant Program Associate, Marine Science Education
Mark Wiley N.H. Sea Grant Assistant Director for Education
Situation: 

Literacy is the foundation upon which people make informed decisions. A public with little understanding of ocean and coastal science results is a generally uninformed and apathetic public regarding the vulnerability and value of our nation’s coastal resources. This leads to a lack of understanding of coastal conservation and management decision-making for people who are, and will be, our country’s voters, workforce, and political and community leaders. National reports have reiterated the need for an informed public and well-trained workforce in ocean, coastal and Great Lakes issues (Pew Oceans Commission, 2003); U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, 2004). Specifically, the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy highlights the significance and excellence of the Sea Grant education program (e.g., Chapter 8).

In 2011 the National Research Council published Conceptual Framework for New Science Education Standards, a seminal document designed to articulate the philosophy and best practices for a new set of national K-12 science standards. This framework document acted as the blueprint for the recently published Next Generation Science Standards which are expected to be adopted as the official state science standards by a majority of states in the county. These standards will constitute the science content and performance expectations that U.S. students and educators will be held to for some time to come. This set of standards include, for the first time, extensive earth science and marine content based upon current ecological, biological, and geologic theories. These standards are also designed to be delivered through increased use of hands-on and inquiry-based approaches. The new content and pedagogical approaches inherent in these standards will put added pressure on marine educators to provide professional development support in ocean science to existing and future formal educators. Programs like Sea Grant are well positioned to help provide the curriculum resources and teacher professional development necessary to succeed.

In addition to the challenges presented by the new science standards, there is significant concern about the need for a substantial increase in the number of college graduates from the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines to fulfill the workforce needs of U.S. businesses and industry. New Hampshire higher education institutions have pledged to double the number of STEM graduates from their programs in the near future, which will require a correlative increase in the number of high school graduates interested in, and capable of, undertaking undergraduate and graduate programs in STEM. This will increase the demand for formal and informal STEM programming to develop that capacity, as well as increased professional development support for informal and forma educators. Sea Grant is again well positioned to help provide those programs and that support as it related to the ocean and climate sciences.

N.H. has over 470 schools serving nearly a quarter million students with an average per pupil expenditure of $13,725. While these students generally perform at very high levels in mathematics and science relative to other U.S. students, there still exists a need to increase the number of graduates with strong science and mathematics backgrounds. N.H. Sea Grant is well-positioned both geographically and professionally to help address this need.

Goals: 

Overall Goal: New Hampshire citizens increase their environmental literacy and stewardship activity and utilize that increased knowledge in natural resource decision-making.

Sub-Goals

1.     Environmentally literate and engaged pre-K–12 students and adults supported by formal and informal education, communication tools, and outreach opportunities in environmental sciences.

2.     A workforce skilled in science technology, engineering and other disciplines critical to the resolution of environmental issues.

Objectives: 

To have 5,000 or more pre-K though 12 students and adults measurably increase their environmental and ocean literacy through interaction with NHSG programming annually.

To have 25 formal and informal educators utilize environmental science curricula and programming grounded in the Climate and Ocean Literacy Principles and pertinent Next Generation Science Standards as a result of NHSG Education professional development programming.

To have at least 15 new UNH Marine Docents measurable increase their content knowledge and pedagogy to deliver environmental literacy content in formal and informal education settings.

Accomplishments: 

2015

Marine education centers save money and increase programming using UNH Marine Docents

N.H. Sea Grant-trained docents provided over $95,000 worth of services to three N.H. marine education centers in 2015, enabling the centers to provide high quality marine science programs to a wide range of visitors, programs that the centers wouldn't be able to provide without this assistance.
Relevance: Providing marine education is an important step in increasing understanding of the marine environment and the challenges it faces and in fostering a sense of stewardship of our coastal resources.
Response: The Seacoast Science Center, Gundalow Company and Great Bay Discovery Center are marine education organizations in New Hampshire with a combined visitorship of over 80,000 per year. The Seacoast Science Center is a site-based, informal education center that specializes in rocky shore programming in Rye. The Gundalow Company is a boat-based maritime history and environmental education program in Portsmouth, and the Great Bay Discovery Center is the educational center of the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and N.H. Fish and Game specializing in estuary education and located in Greenland. All three are able to complete their missions with the assistance of UNH Marine Docents who are trained and coordinated by N.H. Sea Grant.
Results: The docents apply their Sea Grant training to provide programs and support to the three organizations, enabling the centers to significantly reduce the cost of programming staff and increase the number of programs they can provide and visitors they serve. Docents provided over $95,000 worth of services to the three organizations during 2015.

Lessons developed during weeklong teacher workshop used in N.H. schools

N.H. Sea Grant staff developed a one-week professional development workshop for middle and high school teachers attended by 17 N.H. middle and high school teachers, resulting in the development of one high school and three middle school lessons, two of which were used in schools to increase ocean literacy.
Relevance: Successful implementation of the Pew Ocean Commission report's recommendations and NOAA's plan to increase ocean literacy requires educators in formal, pre-K through grade 12 settings to be trained in both marine science concepts and the new Next Generation Science Standards.
Response: In 2015, N.H. Sea Grant staff developed a one-week professional development workshop for middle and high school teachers that occurred at the Shoals Marine Laboratory on Appledore Island in Maine, a field-based marine education facility. The workshop was designed to provide teachers with field-based training in marine concepts, training in lesson plan development based on the Next Generation Science Standards, and the opportunity to work in grade level groups to prepare a lesson to be used during the 2015-2016 school year.
Results: Seventeen New Hampshire middle and high school teachers participated in the weeklong workshop taught by N.H. Sea Grant staff, resulting in the development of one high school and three middle school lessons to be used in the 2015-2016 school year. Teachers from two of the four groups have reported using the lesson in their schools, thus increasing students' ocean literacy.

N.H. Sea Grant leadership in STEM initiative results in significant contributions to state task force
During 2015 N.H. Sea Grant staff provided significant leadership to a STEM collaborative in N.H. which contributed important feedback to the N.H. governor’s STEM Task Force and was recognized by the task force for those contributions. Two members of the collaborative have gone on to STEM leadership roles in the state.
Relevance: In 2014, the Governor of New Hampshire created a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Task Force to provide recommendations to increase the number of STEM-trained students to help meet the employment needs of N.H. technology and engineering companies. The presidents of the universities in the University System of New Hampshire also pledged to double the number of STEM graduates from their institutions.
Response: During 2015, N.H. Sea Grant continued to facilitate the development of a statewide science, technology, engineering and math education collaborative organization called STEM NH. It is comprised of representatives from N.H. schools, institutions of higher learning, STEM professional development providers, and state government. The goal of the organization is to develop local solutions to the STEM pipeline workforce development challenge.
Results: STEM NH contributed significant feedback to the governor’s task force, and was recognized by the task force for those contributions. One member of STEM NH was subsequently named to a second task force charged with guiding the implementation of the task force, and another STEM NH member was hired by the N.H. Department of Education to lead its science programs.

N.H. Sea Grant educators lead effort to increase engagement in STEM education in N.H.
N.H. Sea Grant staff led a collaborative effort within the University of New Hampshire to partner with the Ocean Exploration Trust to form a community of formal and informal education entities focused on increasing the number of youth and educators engaged in STEM education in N.H.
Relevance: In 2012, the Forbes Leadership Forum identified the need to increase the size of the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education pipeline by maintaining an enthusiasm for STEM throughout high school and college. Our youngest students show an interest in STEM subjects, but the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology concluded that roughly 40% of college students planning to major in engineering and science switch to other subjects. STEM-related degrees represent only about one-third of all the bachelor’s degrees awarded in the U.S. In Japan, China and Singapore, more than 50% of bachelor’s awarded are STEM related.
Response: N.H. Sea Grant staff led a collaborative effort within the University of New Hampshire to partner with the Ocean Exploration Trust, a Rhode Island-based not-for-profit that provides interactive ocean exploration and related curriculum resources, to form a community of formal and informal education entities focused on increasing the number of youth and educators engaged in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education in N.H. Activities include professional development for formal and informal educators, access to live ocean exploration, interaction with scientists and educators involved in the exploration, and access to, and training in, curriculum related to the exploration.
Results: During 2015, the partnership and collaboration within UNH was formed, 25 teachers attended an initial professional development workshop to be trained to integrate the live ocean exploration interactions into their classrooms and to utilize the associated curriculum materials. Also, N.H. Sea Grant education staff began the scheduling of 50 live exploration interactions.

N.H. Sea Grant-trained volunteers teach thousands of school children in schools, on boats, and at events

The UNH Marine Docents, a volunteer-based program coordinated by N.H. Sea Grant that brings Ocean Literacy Standard- and Next Generation Standard-aligned programs to pre-K–12 and informal settings in New Hampshire, volunteered over 12,700 hours and delivered 122 programs to 2,805 students during 2015, increasing students' marine science knowledge.
Relevance: To achieve the marine education goals of increased ocean and climate literacy called for in the Pew Ocean Commission report and NOAA's plan to increase ocean literacy, students in formal education settings need the opportunity to learn marine science concepts aligned with the new Next Generation Science Standards.
Response: The UNH Marine Docent Program is a volunteer-based program coordinated by N.H. Sea Grant that brings Ocean Literacy Standard- and Next Generation Standard-aligned programs to pre-K–12 and informal settings in New Hampshire. It is considered by the National Sea Grant Office to be a Best Management Practice for the use of volunteers in marine education. Volunteers deliver programs in school classrooms and on vessels.
Results: UNH Marine Docents volunteered over 12,700 hours and delivered 122 programs to 2,805 students during 2015, including in-school programs, day-long Day of the Coast programs and half-day boat-based Floating Labs. To monitor program effectiveness, a sample of these programs were evaluated using a teacher survey. Over 90% of respondents to the survey report being highly satisfied with the quality and educational effectiveness of the programs.

Annual marine open house at the University of New Hampshire attracts thousands

In 2015, over 2000 people attended the annual open-house event at the University of New Hampshire held in partnership with N.H. Sea Grant to raise awareness of the marine environment and highlight marine science education and facilities at the University.
Relevance: Sea Grant's mission is to promote the understanding, wise use and stewardship of our coastal resources. Within the larger mission, one of N.H. Sea Grant's goals is to create a workforce skilled in disciplines critical to the resolution of environmental issues. Raising awareness of the marine environment, sparking the interest of youth in marine science, and highlighting the facilities and research at the University of New Hampshire geared towards studying our coastal resources are important steps toward meeting these missions.
Response: UNH's School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering, in partnership with N.H. Sea Grant, created Ocean Discovery Day in 2010. Ocean Discovery Day is a two-day open-house event at one of UNH's marine research and teaching facilities to highlight how scientists and students engage with our rich natural resources and utilize N.H.'s proximity to the ocean for their studies. The first day is reserved for school groups and educators while the second is open to the general public.
Results: In 2015, over 1500 students and teachers and 800 members of the general public attended the event, participating in many hands-on demonstrations, tours and talks presented by over 250 volunteers from N.H. Sea Grant, its docent program, and UNH. Participants were exposed to on topics such as ocean renewable energy, aquaculture, seafloor mapping and underwater exploration, increasing knowledge and awareness, and exposing future potential college students to UNH's work in marine science.

N.H. Sea Grant and marine docents revise boat building manual for program licensing

During 2015 a committee of experienced UNH Marine Docent boat builders created a detailed instruction manual for constructing the Oyster River Cat, a 12 foot wooden sailboat. This updated and revised manual will act as the official construction manual, and as a required element in the licensing of the boat and program for sale.
Relevance: For over a decade, the UNH Marine Docent Program has helped families build 12-foot wooden sailboats in a weekend-long course. The boat, the Oyster River Cat, was designed by a local boat designer, but official technical drawings were never prepared for the boat. UNH Marine Docents, coordinated and trained by N.H. Sea Grant, created simple plans and building instructions for the preparation and construction of the boat, but plans to license the boat and program so that others could build it require formal plans and a more detailed construction manual.
Response: A committee of experienced docent boat builders convened to create a step-by-step, highly detailed construction manual for the program during 2015 as an important step towards licensing.
Results: The manual created from that effort will become the standard manual for building the boat as part of the UNH Marine Docent Family Boat Building Program, and will also become the foundation document for the boat plans and license.

N.H. Sea Grant increases awareness of N.H.'s marine environment through public cruises

N.H. Sea Grant and the University of New Hampshire Marine Docents, volunteers coordinated and trained by N.H. Sea Grant, led 23 cruises for 550 people aboard UNH's research vessel in 2015, introducing participants to research going on along N.H.'s coast as well as tools and techniques used by scientists to investigate marine and estuarine systems and increasing their awareness, knowledge and connectedness to the marine environment in N.H.
Relevance: New Hampshire's coast has ecological, environmental, historic and cultural significance. It is one of the most densely populated regions in the state and attracts millions of visitors each year yet knowledge about N.H.'s coastal resources varies.
Response: To increase knowledge and connectedness to N.H.'s coastal water resources, for over 15 years N.H. Sea Grant has offered the public day-long boat-based educational cruises about the natural and cultural history of Appledore Island, one of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of Maine and N.H., and about the marine and estuarine ecosystems of N.H.'s Great Bay Estuary.
Results: N.H. Sea Grant staff and UNH Marine Docents, volunteers coordinated and trained by N.H. Sea Grant, led 18 cruises to Appledore and five activity-based cruises into Great Bay for 550 people during 2015. At Appledore, participants visited the Shoals Marine Lab and Celia Thaxter's gardens, collected marine life samples, conducted water tests, and learned about the history, culture and science of the N.H. coast, the Gulf of Maine and the Isles of Shoals. On the Great Bay cruises, over 90% of participants reported an increase in knowledge of the estuary's physical and chemical characteristics and its inhabitants, of the interrelationships between the biotic and abiotic, and an increase in their feelings of connectedness, curiosity and concern for the estuary. Great Bay cruise participants also learned about tools and techniques used by scientists conducting research in the bay and at UNH's Jackson Estuarine Laboratory. Feedback is consistently positive about the value and quality of the educational experience.

UNH Marine Docents develop educational program on evolution to address identified need

UNH Marine Docents coordinated and trained by N.H. Sea Grant developed a new educational program on marine-based evolution and pilot-tested it at several grade levels during 2015 to address an observed lack of understanding of evolution and adaptation.
Relevance: UNH Marine Docent educational programs often include adaptations of marine organisms as a central concept of the program. While leading these programs docents have observed that many middle school students have a limited understanding of evolution.
Response: A new program on evolution was developed and pilot-tested at several grade levels during 2015 by UNH Marine Docents coordinated and trained by N.H. Sea Grant. The program explains evolution, natural selection and adaptations in a clear and understandable way and consists of a PowerPoint presentation followed by several hands-on stations through which students rotate. The program is aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and the Ocean Literacy Principles.
Results: The evolution program was pilot-tested and revised and has been added to the catalog of marine education programs UNH Marine Docents offer to schools.

N.H. Sea Grant continues to recruit and train docents to provide quality marine science education

In order to maintain and expand its UNH Marine Docent program, which provides marine science programming to schools and informal settings throughout N.H., N.H. Sea Grant staff trained 19 new docents in 2015.
Relevance: To achieve the education goals of the Pew Ocean Commission report and NOAA's plan to increase ocean literacy, students in formal education settings need the opportunity to learn marine science concepts aligned with the new Next Generation Science Standards. The UNH Marine Docent Program is a volunteer-based program coordinated by N.H. Sea Grant that brings Ocean Literacy Standard- and Next Generation Standard-aligned programs to pre-K–12 and informal settings in New Hampshire. New docents are needed every year to expand programming and replace those who become inactive.
Response: Each year, N.H. Sea Grant staff train new UNH Marine Docents two days a week from September through April. Each training session lasts 2.5 hours. Docents are provided with basic conceptual knowledge of marine science and informal education techniques to prepare them to join existing docent program teams.
Results: N.H. Sea Grant trained 19 new docents during 2015 who are now providing educational programming to schools or are volunteering at other informal marine education venues. In addition, N.H. Sea Grant staff conducted 12 monthly docent meetings, each attended by close to 100 docents that provided in-depth training on marine-related topics to new and existing docents.

2014

Marine education centers save money using UNH Marine Docents
NHSG-trained docents provide a significant economic benefit to three N.H. marine education centers, enabling them to provide high quality marine science programs to a wide range of visitors, programs that the centers wouldn't be able to provide without this assistance.
Relevance: Providing marine education is an important step in increasing understanding of the marine environment and the challenges it faces and in fostering a sense of stewardship of our coastal resources.
Response: The Seacoast Science Center, Gundalow Company and Great Bay Discovery Center are marine education organizations with a combined visitorship of over 80,000 per year. The Seacoast Science Center is a site-based, informal education center that specializes in rocky shore programming in Rye, N.H. The Gundalow Company is a boat-based maritime history and environmental education program in Portsmouth, N.H. The Great Bay Discovery Center is a site-based educational program of the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and N.H. Fish and Game located in Greenland and specializing in estuary education. All three are able to complete their missions with the assistance of UNH Marine Docents.
Results: The docents apply their Sea Grant training to provide programs and support to the three organizations, enabling the centers to significantly reduce the cost of programming staff and increase the number of programs they can provide and visitors they serve. Docents provided over $97,000 worth of services to the three organizations during 2014. N.H.

Sea Grant hosts teams from three states in 2014 Nor'easter Bowl
NHSG welcomed 17 teams of high school students from Maine, N.H. and Vt. to the Nor'easter Bowl, the regional competition of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), at the University of New Hampshire on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014. NHSG coordinated and staffed the event with help from its UNH Marine Docents, handling such tasks as recruiting and training judges and all logisitcs. With questions about ocean science ranging from chemistry to geology to technology to biology, four students from each competing high school were challenged to display their understanding of ocean science. The winning team from Windham High School in N.H. earned a trip to the NOSB national finals in Seattle, Wash., in April 2014. The event is part of a larger effort to promote ocean literacy in schools and to the public. Prizes include partial scholarships to the sponsoring universities. The competition is sponsored by the Washington, D.C., based Consortium for Ocean Leadership.

N.H. Sea Grant helping foster STEM education in state
During 2014, NHSG continued to facilitate the development of a statewide science, technology, engineering and math education collaborative organization called STEM NH. It is comprised of representatives from N.H. schools, institutions of higher learning, STEM professional development providers, and state government. The goal of the organization is to develop local solutions to the STEM pipeline workforce development challenge.

N.H. Sea Grant produces video to promote UNH's Ocean Discovery Day
N.H. Sea Grant produced a short video in 2014 to help promote UNH's Ocean Discovery Day, a free event that focuses on marine science and engineering. The video encourages children and adults to attend the event to learn about marine science topics from NHSG-trained UNH Marine Docents and UNH researchers in a hands-on environment. The video has been viewed more than 200 times on YouTube and was shared on social media to help promote the event, providing a visual companion piece to news stories and announcements about Ocean Discovery Day. N.H.

Sea Grant designs poster to promote UNH Marine Docent program
In 2014, N.H. Sea Grant designed a poster to help promote the UNH Marine Docent program coordinated by NHSG and UNH Cooperative Extension. The poster was displayed at NHSG's first research symposium to inform attendees about the in-school and boat-based educational programs offered by the Docents. The design is colorful, photo-heavy and engaging, and it was printed on a canvas material to allow program coordinators to use the poster at a variety of indoor and outdoor public events in the coming years. The poster provides a simple method of advertising the Docent programs to promote marine literacy in Northern New England.

N.H. Sea Grant and Marine Docents help five families gain boat building skills
During the weekend of May 16-18, 2014, teams of UNH Marine Docents helped five families build an Oyster Cat 12-foot sailboat and, in the process, taught the families boat building skills. The program gives each family the experience of completing a complex task together and a means of enjoying New Hampshire's marine and freshwater resources. The NHSG-trained docents prepared the parts of the sailboat in the months prior to the build and guided the families in the construction of the vessel over the three-day weekend. After construction was completed, families returned three weeks later with their freshly painted boats for water safety instruction and a sailing lesson.

N.H. Sea Grant-trained volunteers teach hundreds of school children
During 2014, the NHSG-trained Marine Docents conducted some 75 SeaTrek marine education programs for approximately 2,200 students at 35 regional schools. These included two Day of the Coast programs, which are day-long, school-wide efforts. During all of these events, the docents helped teachers introduce Next Generation Science Standards while covering subject matter ranging from organisms to habitats and from plate tectonics to climate change.

Boat-based programs help N.H. Sea Grant interest students in marine science
Using a tour boat out of Seabrook, N.H., NHSG-trained docents taught 180 students from six schools about marine science through hands-on activities during 2014. During this half-day Floating Lab program, the students learned about the Gulf of Maine marine environment by participating in water quality measurement, plankton collection and observation, current measurement, benthic sampling and navigation, all of which feature elements of the Next Generation Science Standards.

N.H. Sea Grant offers greater variety in its Explore Appledore Island discovery cruise
During the summer of 2014, some 526 children and adults learned more about the history, culture and science of the N.H. coast, the Gulf of Maine and the Isles of Shoals while participating in mini research cruises. Powered by NHSG-trained docents, the cruises gave participants opportunities to collect marine life samples and run water tests on cruises to visit the Shoals Marine Lab and, new this year, the famed Celia Thaxter Gardens on Appledore Island.

Public festivals give N.H. Sea Grant access to wide audiences
Docents trained by NHSG participated in three major N.H. festivals during 2014, providing marine science awareness to thousands. Each event gave docents a chance to engage large and different audiences with information about the importance of marine topics ranging from Gulf of Maine habitats to N.H. maritime history. These events were Discover Wild New Hampshire Day in Concord in May, Portsmouth's Tall Ships weekend in July, and UNH's University Day in September.

N.H. Sea Grant and its docents show the way on Ocean Discovery Day
During 2014, NHSG provided continued leadership for the annual UNH School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering's Ocean Discovery Day, which is an open-house event at two of UNH's marine research and teaching facilities. The event attracted over 1,200 students and teachers and 500 members of the general public. Over 160 volunteers from the Docent Program, Sea Grant and the University provided multiple educational programs at each site and helped showcase UNH's marine research activities and educational offerings.

UNH Marine Docents and UNH create educational puppet show to excite students about ocean literacy
In 2014, UNH Marine Docents, N.H. Sea Grant-trained volunteer educators, initiated a partnership with the UNH Theater and Dance Department to create a musical puppet program designed to introduce younger students to ocean issues in an entertaining and engaging way. The original production, entitled "What's All the ComOCEAN?," utilizes large puppets manipulated by the docents to tell the musical story of Haddie the Haddock as she tries to unravel problems plaguing the Gulf of Maine. The program will be first performed by undergraduate theater majors during the summer of 2015 throughout New Hampshire, then offered to schools and groups as part of the catalog of SeaTrek programs offered by the docents.

New NHSG educational program focuses on sharks
In 2014, the NHSG-trained UNH Marine Docents created a new SeaTrek program that introduces students to the biological and ecological characteristics of sharks. Particular attention is paid to the challenges sharks face through harvesting, their critical importance to ocean ecosystems, and the inaccurate characterization of sharks as dangerous. This program, which incorporates the Next Generation Science Standards, is being offered to schools beginning in the spring of 2015 as part of the catalog of SeaTrek programs offered by the docents.

Collaborations with other N.H. marine education organizations help Sea Grant fulfill its mission
Throughout 2014, N.H. Sea Grant continued to work with its state marine education partners – the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, the Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, and the Portsmouth-based Blue Ocean Society and Gundalow Company. Collaborative programs are often led by NHSG-trained docents and include explorations of tide pools, creature experiences in touch tanks, cruises aboard an authentic gundalow, estuary ecology, and beach clean-ups.

N.H. Sea Grant continues to lead regional and national marine education planning
NHSG's assistant director for education served as chair of the Sea Grant Educators Network during 2014 and continued to collaborate in leading regional planning efforts. As a member of the governing board of the New England Ocean Science Education Collaborative (NEOSEC), a regional organization sponsored by the Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence – New England, he participated in NEOSEC summit conferences and made significant contributions to organization planning.

N.H. Sea Grant continues to recruit and train docents
During 2014, NHSG recruited and trained 30 new docents, a record for the 37-year-old program. Docents attend class twice a week for six months, receiving training that covers basic marine science and formal and informal education practices. These new docents joined existing program teams to provide educational programming to schools or are volunteering at other informal marine education venues, including the Seacoast Science Center, Great Bay Discovery Center and the Gundalow Company. Sea Grant also conducted 12 monthly meetings, each of which was attended by over 70 docents and featured in-depth training on a marine-related subject.

Publications

Available from the National Sea Grant Library (use NHU number to search) or NH Sea Grant

CD/Video

  • UNH Marine Docent SeaTrek - whales (video). 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nS3DSW2bv08
  • UNH Marine Docent SeaTrek - squid dissection (video). 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d4s6aR_cXs
  • Ocean Discovery Day (2014) (video). See N.H. Sea Grant's YouTube channel.
  • The making of What's All the ComOcean? puppet musical (video). 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiAxJTGMXKc
  • UNH Marine Docent family boat building (video). 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0YK1P6fTHU
  • UNH Marine Docent coastal floating lab (video). 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndxZyTzeztI

Information Sheet

  • New Hampshire Sea Grant marine docent program (2015). Colin MacNamee, Celina Wilt and Noah Goldstein.
  • New Hampshire Sea Grant Ocean Discovery Day (2015). Colin MacNamee, Celina Wilt and Noah Goldstein.

Poster

  • UNH Marine Docent program (2015). Rebecca Zeiber.