Brian E. Doyle Undergraduate Marine Science Fellowship

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Project Type: 
Education
Abstract: 

This competitive program seeks to focus students on connecting research to extension, education and communications as members of the N.H. Sea Grant team. Doyle Fellows work hands-on with marine science extension and education professionals to help individuals and organizations make informed decisions regarding our marine resources. NHSG provides a wide range of opportuities for students to participate in research and extension programs, including fisheries, aquaculture, marine literacy and coastal resource management. The goal of this program is to provide a mechanism to encourage and assist students in their pursuit of a career in marine science with a secondary goal of making students more aware of NOAA and Sea Grant approaches for providing science supporting America's coasts.

2015 Accomplishments

Doyle Fellows supported by N.H. Sea Grant in 2015 work on coastal ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture projects

N.H. Sea Grant supported two Brian E. Doyle Undergraduate Marine Science Fellows in 2015 who worked with N.H. Sea Grant staff on projects related to citizen science, community-based habitat restoration, aquaculture, microplastics, marine debris and the European green crab.
Relevance: Brian Doyle was a long-time supporter of the marine sciences, Sea Grant and undergraduate education. He served as associate director of N.H. Sea Grant for many years prior to his death in 2008. He was dedicated to student development and realized the importance of encouraging undergraduate students to pursue degree programs and careers in marine science-related fields.
Response: N.H. Sea Grant established the Brian E. Doyle Undergraduate Marine Science Fellowship in 2011 to address the need for workforce development in marine science and policy areas, with a secondary goal of making students more aware of NOAA and Sea Grant approaches for providing science supporting America's coasts. The program seeks to focus students on connecting research to extension, education and communications as members of the N.H. Sea Grant team. Doyle Fellows spend the summer working with N.H. Sea Grant staff.
Results: Two UNH undergraduates were awarded fellowships for the summer of 2015. One worked with N.H. Sea Grant's coastal ecosystems specialist on citizen science and community-based habitat restoration projects such as glass eel monitoring and sand dune restoration. The other fellow worked with aquaculture and fisheries specialists from N.H. Sea Grant on integrated multi-trophic aquaculture of rainbow trout, blue mussels and seaweed; microplastics monitoring on N.H. beaches; marine debris cleanup; and researching the European green crab. The fellows blogged about their experiences to promote the fellowship and attract the interest of potential future fellowship applicants.

N.H. Sea Grant information sheet on climate champions spreads awareness

N.H. Sea Grant produced an information sheet in 2015 that condenses the content of a report about supporting climate adaptation "champions" in coastal New England communities in order to provide an easy-to-read synopsis to a wider audience.
Relevance: A report produced by a 2014 N.H. Sea Grant Doyle Fellow provided an in-depth look at the challenges facing "champions" of climate adaptation in coastal communities throughout northern New England. The document is 29 pages long and provides detailed information for organizations and individuals who want to support these champions.
Response: N.H. Sea Grant produced a two-page information sheet in 2015 that condenses the report contents into a more concise format for a quick glance at the report's main points and highlights.
Results: The information sheet was distributed on social media and at various conferences, workshops and public events to help spread awareness of the work and needs of climate champions.

2014 Accomplishments

Doyle Fellow experiences shared through newly developed NHSG blog
The N.H. Sea Grant-sponsored Doyle Fellowship enables undergraduates to work alongside Sea Grant extension and education staff and support their work in citizen science, environmental literacy and aquaculture each summer. The fellowship was established in memory of the former NHSG associate director to address the need for workforce development in marine science and policy areas. The experiences of the fellows have now been captured and shared in a blog developed in 2014 on the Sea Grant website. Blog entries provide details about each fellow’s activities and any findings, publications or other products. Fellows are encouraged to contribute to the blog as their fellowships unfold, providing a record of their activities that serves to promote the fellowship and attract the interest of potential future fellowship applicants.

N.H. Sea Grant Doyle Fellow first UNH student to culture juvenile oysters
A Doyle Fellow spent the summer of 2014 working with NHSG’s marine aquaculture specialist to learn about the integrated aquaculture of blue mussels, sugar kelp and steelhead trout. As part of his fellowship, the University of New Hampshire undergraduate also investigated the efficacy of the green sea urchin as an anti-fouling agent for Belon oysters grown in cages at the bottom of the ocean. The green sea urchin proved effective at reducing bio-fouling on oyster cages and shells. These results caused him to explore larval rearing strategies to raise Belon oysters from lab-based sources and he was able to culture several hundred juveniles, a first for a UNH student.

NHSG Doyle Fellow develops local seafood app
Amanda Parks, a UNH junior and 2014 Doyle Fellow, developed the Local Fish Finder, a mobile phone application that will help consumers find where they can purchase local seafood. The application provides a consumer seafood buying guide tailored for the N.H. seacoast. The application was developed with content identifying local retailers and restaurants that provide local seafood to consumers. The application was released on both iPhone and Android platforms and was used during the summer and fall of 2014. During this time, there were a total of 2,052 downloads and 4,189 launches of the application by consumers. The application had a Google Play rating of 3.5/5 (Apple does not have ratings). We are currently looking to update the application for use in 2015, when we will also track consumer activity and response to the application. Created to honor NHSG’s former associate director, the fellowship was established to address the need for workforce development in marine science and policy areas.

N.H. Sea Grant supports three Doyle Fellows
NHSG continued its very successful Brian Doyle Undergraduate Marine Extension Fellowship program in 2014. UNH ecogastronomy major Amanda Parks worked to develop and make available a mobile phone app that provides information on where consumers can buy locally harvested seafood. Alexandra Philip, a UNH environmental conservation major, conducted research on the work and needs of climate champions in coastal communities in southern Maine, northern Mass. and N.H., and prepared a report on her findings. UNH biology major Daniel Tauriello conducted aquaculture research at the UNH Coastal Marine Lab and Judd Gregg Marine Support Center, where he was able to spawn and culture European oysters (Ostrea edulis). In addition, the fellows blogged about their experiences this year as a way to share their work with others, including future Doyle Fellows.

N.H. Sea Grant Doyle Fellow writes report about “champions” of climate adaptation in New England
N.H. Sea Grant produced a 32-page report, "Sustaining champions of climate adaptation in coastal communities: a Northern New England study." The report was researched and written by a 2014 NHSG undergraduate Doyle Fellow who conducted semi-structured interviews of people identified as climate adaptation promoters and implementers in southern Maine, northern Mass. and N.H. The report focuses on the challenges faced by leaders in coastal communities who are helping their municipality adapt to sea-level rise, increases in heavy precipitation and flooding. Thus far, it has been distributed to professional climate adaptation networks in New England that are providing assistance to communities, including Maine, Conn. and the Upper Valley of N.H. and Vt., and findings have also been shared nationally. The report encourages expanded support for coordinated, locally grounded climate adaptation assistance to help these champions to continue their efforts to protect their communities and to "normalize" climate preparedness in community decision-making.

Publications

Available from the National Sea Grant Library (use NHU number to search) or NH Sea Grant

Report

  • Sustaining champions of climate adaptation in coastal communities: a northern New England study. Alexandra Philip.

CD/Video

  • Connect to conserve: internships with N.H. Sea Grant and UNH Cooperative Extension (2014) (video). See N.H. Sea Grant's YouTube channel.

Information Sheet

  • Sustaining champions of climate adaptation in coastal communities: a Northern New England study (2015). Alexandra Philip.